NAC’s National Standards Report

Another interesting read on National Autism Center’s National Standards Project – read their description below and then click the link at the bottom to download the PDF.

The National Autism Center is pleased to announce the completion of the National Standards Project and the publication of the National Standards Report. Click here to see the results!

The National Standards Project answers one of the most pressing public health questions of our time — how do we effectively treat individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)?

The National Autism Center launched the project in 2005 with the support and guidance of an expert panel composed of nationally recognized scholars, researchers, and other leaders representing diverse fields of study. The culmination of this rigorous multi-year project is the National Standards Report, the most comprehensive analysis available to date about treatments for children and adolescents with ASD.

http://www.nationalautismcenter.org/affiliates/

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SCERTS = Interesting!

Description from the SCERTS website (click link below).   Sounds really interesting!  Mama has to investigate more.

The SCERTS® Model is a research-based educational approach and multidisciplinary framework that directly addresses the core challenges faced by children and persons with ASD and related disabilities, and their families. SCERTS® focuses on building competence in Social Communication, Emotional Regulation and Transactional Support as the highest priorities that must be addressed in any program, and is applicable for individuals with a wide range of abilities and ages across home, school and community settings.

http://scerts.com/

Behavioral and Disorder. Two Words that Don’t Belong with Autism.

Mama does not like the words “behaivoral” or “disorder.”  It’s time to smack those negative associations down when referring to autism.  Smack them down!!!  lol

You would be surprised at how many people still think of autism as a behavioral disorder, a mental illness or even refer to autism using the “R” word – which Mama hates SO much, that I won’t even reproduce it in reference for you – you can figure it out, I’m sure.  I tell people this all the time, and they are always surprised – Autism is a NEUROLOGICAL condition.   Yes.

Snackie and I were having a long discussion while watching the Oscars the other night (which I thought were really good this year, but that’s for another post) and we were griping about how even the words “Autism Spectrum Disorder” have such negative connotation to them.  We need to come up with another way to talk about this!

I’m not saying autism is a walk in the park for anyone touched by it, but the way some view the words associated with the labels, the depreciating way that someone with autism is sometimes viewed – well, Mama doesn’t like that!  I’m sure other individuals with autism don’t love it either.

First, we need to throw “disorder” out.  Does this mean that any pain suffered by those with autism or their families should be discounted?  No, but we don’t say Cancer Disorder, do we.  The person who has the cancer is not defective, it’s the cancer itself that is causing the pain.

Then, even the word autism is looked at in a negative light.  Like Mama said, so many people have no idea what autism really is, and they just assume that this means a child with a behavioral problem, or that the child is that stupid “R” word.  They assume that they are intellectually “less than.”  And Mama doesn’t like that reference for anyone, regardless of whatever “label” that individual has been “crowned with” from our society.

We ended up enjoying “Spectrum Processing.”  We thought it was important for the individual with autism to be able to categorize their challenges for themselves, but by doing so in a way that wouldn’t depreciate them.

Scientist Carl thinks that we should add another word to make it an even three-letter acronym, like HBP or ESP, because it’s easier for people to reference that way.

Mama has to think more about that one.  Hmm.

Click the link below for a good site to dispel some autism myths…

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/autism/detail_autism.htm